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星力手游捕鱼

时间:2020-06-04 02:22:15作者:Mckay

导语:在线领A片【AG88.SHOP】星力手游捕鱼How to make your start-up busi/ness sus\tainable from day one
星力手游捕鱼Ic【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsAgriculture i【s facing a/ hi【storical challenge. In the next 3】0【 【ye【ars, food /demand will【 increa】se\ by 70 %.Facing this, it /will be necessary to i【ncrease an【d/ improv【e /production, /but al\/so】【 to lim】】it its impact on the env/ironment.Research/ers at Bio Sense institute, in Novi Sad, Serbia ar\e connecting sta【te-of-the-art technologies to crops to /cha【nge the productive model.Their mantra: "we c/annot feed\ today's world wit】h yes【ter//day 【agriculture".\And that is al/so】 the driving force behind t/he An【tares European project, which has developed a centre for ad/vanced technologies a【nd sustainable agric】ulture in this Se】rbian city located alongside the Danube.The【 Research/ Institute fo【r/ Information Technologies in】 Biosystems/ is part 】o【\f a Euro\pean funded programme to wide\n the participati/o】n of\ memb【er states and/ associated countr/i/【es who are lag【ging behind/ in /terms of res】earch and innovation.The Digit\al FarmAgriculture of the 【futu【re wil/l use 】advanced】 technologies, such as s/e【nsors, robots, drones, big data and sa】t\ellit】e/ ima/g/er/y."With a growing popul【a】tion, we need \to produce in t】【he/ next 40 years as much fo【od as we did in the pa】st 1/0000 years to\ do /that\," explai/ns Antar【es project coord】in/ator/ and electro\nics engi【ne】er, Vesna Bengin."We n【e\ed 【sensors a\nd senso】rs and some more sensors and some artific】ial intelligence on top of t【hat....to make our culture m【ore efficie\nt."Micro and nanoel】ectroni】cs de【\v/ices ena/ble farmers to c【heck th】e general s\ituation of the crops an】d sp/ot 【potential diseases at/ very early stages."Soil sensors will give 【you \the in\formation w/hen\ to irriga/t/\e and th/en not so you can diminish t\he amount of water tha\t】 is used for the ir】rigation \pro【cess," says 】Goran Kitić,/ the head of the nano-mic【ro-elec\tr】onics/ laboratory at the Biosense institute./"B】\ut/\ also we\'【re developing som\e sort of s【olutions that tell you how much of the food【 for /the plant is i/n the so\il h\ow muc【h nitrogen is in/ disarray."Several 'Digital Farm' pilot projects have alread/y been la】/\un/ched in Serbia."Digital【 agri【culture 】is t/he agric/ulture based on heavy u/s/e of d\ata\ so tha【t we are trying to 】colle/ct d】a】ta【/【 in opp【ortunis】tical【ly 【fr/om【 sensors,/ from 】the soil, fr\om plants, animals, sate/llites, drones you name it, in/ any p/ossible w】ay," e\xplain】s "d【irector of the Bi】o Se【n【se Instit【u/te,】 Vladimir Crnojević."And then 【to】 u】se the l/a/test 】closure like artificial intelligence, bi】g\【 data concept to find \s/om\e h】idden kn/o【wledge that is not】 obvious."The 】Agrosen【se platf【ormThe virtual】 【counter\part of the Digital 】Fa/rm \is the Agrosense platform.This comprehens】iv/e/ database a【llows farmers to 【plan\ the/ir\ activit【i/es and bett/er m【onit\or crop conditions, d\ue to figu/res comin】g from different sources, such as robots,\ 】optical se/nso\rs, algo\rit【hms, meteorolog】ical st/a】tions an】d satellite data.\"T【h/e system we currently use can iden\ti\fy proble/ms o/n \】a l【eaf, a fruit o【r a vegetable, so we can react \earlier\ th\an \when we might detect it. When w】e【 realiz/e【 it,【 the p【lant is already si】ck, whi】le\ \the camera and t】he\ sensors can de【tect the 【beginning of the disea】se\, " says fa\rmer/,【 Djordje Dju\kic.Satel】lit】e images coming from Copernicus\ European Earth Observatio/n Progr\amme, along with drone thermal vie/ws and smartphone's photos pr【ovide f\ur【t】her in-dep】th inf【ormation about the biol】ogical paramete【rs\ of the /crop and\ t】he f\ield.F】armers c【an al\】so exchange data, send】 pictures,】 rec//eive information o【n how much fertili/zer to use to dispense o】r how to 】optimize irrigation, via sm【ar【tphone apps.Real-time anal【ysis of the \g】【/round properties can be deli\/\vered direct【\ly【 on-/s】ite \by a/ robot /mov】ing n 】a\utonomously through the field and sam】pling the soil.This allows designers to t/a\ilor-make/ the land ma\nagement sys\tem, even on small p\articl/es of the f】ield."This will【 give you the 】results in 1【0 minutes 】an/】d 】you will instantly /know what】'/s the /si】tua/tio】n li\ke, you \w】ill hav【e// a map and\ th/is /wil】l help the 】】farmer to【 be more efficient," sa】ys Goran/ Kitić, the head of nanomicroelectron/ics lab】or】atory at th\e Bios/ense ins/titu/te.The【 resurgenc\e of woodThe c\onst\ruct\ion sector worldwide is res】ponsibl【e for one\-third of al】l the CO2 emission【s and 40% of\ all the/ 】】wastes.Bu\【t sci【entists】 \be/lieve that wood can /ha\ve great】 potential as a carbon sink and offset o/f CO2 emissions. Woo【d has been o】ne of】 the mos\t /exploit\ed b【uilding ma\te\rials throughout history. Mode/rn time】s has s【ee】\n/ 】the 】dominatio\n of ste】el and concrete\, but wood 【is【 once 】again on \the rise.In【 \】Slovenia, the InnoRene【w【 CoE project, a/ r/esearch centre \】/of excell【ence has been crea\t/ed【 to/ deve【lop new b/uilding mat】erials based o【n wo】od and recyc\l/able na\tural prod】u/ct/s."T/imber constru】ctions, /as well 【as the search for new materials \based on natural products】, are ab/out to become more common."By combining c\hemi【str【y/ and com/puter science, material science, we can cr/e】at】e mat【erial that\ can be used in the building where the /people are f/eeling the p【\ositive impacts on the【ir percept】io\n tow【ards the livi/ng\ environment," sa【ys Andreja Kutnar, InnoR【enew CoE project /coordi】nato/r and /p】rofesso/r 】of wood science and tech【nology a】t t\he University of Primors】ka, Koper."/】it's \very sustainabl】e .\..because \when w】e cut/ the【 t\ree 【at the same tim】【e w/e pla\nt another one"Wood /】m\】odification/】 process【es also al】low desired proper】ties to be produ//ced by m\eans \of \【chemical, 】\biologica\l or phy【sica【l agents. And this can co】ntribute t/o re/ducing the envi】ro\nmental footprint and /economic cost【 o】f wood 【maintenance."Wood is basically the champi】on of all the r\enewab】le ma【terial. \】It's not only it's carbon neutral it's actually carbon negative. 【So basically when /you make a wooden house not only you【 d/idn't \r/ea\lly emit any CO2 we were actually s】toring】 it /in the【 construction /itself," says Iztok &Scaro/n;u&/scaron;ter&s/caro】n;i【69; , a research group le\ader at/ the Innorenew Cen\tre of 【Excellence (CoE).Architect/s】 are【 \also lookin\g with interes】t at【 wood【【 【as a we】ll-being solution. A topic of our interest is i\ts con/nection to t【he\ well-bein\g of p】eople. "How 【【buildin/gs can reduce stress. How it can improve health," says Eva \Prelov【&scar【on\;ek Ni\/em\el】ä, a\n【 a】rchitect at Innorenew CoE.Scientific evidence h\as\ confirmed the positiv/e /imp【act of wood in w/orkin】g and li【ving spaces.Michael Burnard,\ the de\puty di\rector of the Innorenew Centre of Ex\cellen】ce say【s "people tend to find t/\he material mo/re pleasant to th】e tou/c【h and nic】er to work】 with."Researchers at the U\niversity of Primorska】 】hav/e also【 \bee【n studying\ prope/rtie】s hidden in natural sustainable ma】terials, as for example\, Cann】abis sativa.Its】【 fibre\s are unde/【rgoing】 a r\enaissance withi【n the construc\tion sec/tor, because of t【h\eir /m/echanical properties"What is in】\teresting is th】e 】m/】echanical performance of i/ts fibres, whic\h\ are almost s\】imilar to】 glass fi\bres】," expla\ins 】Laetitia M】ar】rot, /a researcher, at the I\nno【renew CoE."The he/mp plant is/ also used as an i\nsulation】 material, allowing the house to breathe. The plant will /naturally absorb /m/oisture whe】n there is too much 】or it will re/lease it when t\here is not enough in the air."Pairing the construction s【ector with su/staina\b/l【e/ forestry management cou\ld gener/ate a whole slew of a【ddition/al 【economic, social,】 and environmental b\enefits.1212121/2121212/12J】ournalist n【ame • K】】at/y\ DartfordShare this article】Copy/p\as/te the art】icle video 】embed /link below/:CopySh/areTweetSha/res【endShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareS\hare/Shar【eSendShare】S/hareYou might also like 【【 \ \ Italian/ sc/ientists believe jell【yfish will soon be a brand new \del\ic\acy in Eur/ope 【 / / 【 【 】 】 /\ Latest cutting-edge tech\nolo/gy showcased at J】apan【 trade show 【 【 】 【 \ 【 Cementing the future: the EU's【 ECO\B\/INDER pr\oject 】takes a /hard【 look at concre【te 【 / / / / Mo】re aboutEnvironme【ntal prote【ctio/nNew technologiesResearchAgri/cul\tureArchitecture 】 【 M】ost viewed 【/ 【\ 】 】 】 】 Wha/t influence on climate i//s the coronavirus loc/kdown really having? \/ \ 【 The new AI system\ safeguarding pr\ema\tur\e babies fr\om infect】ion \ / 】 【 Messeng/er/ RNA: the molecule that may teac【【\h our b/\odies to beat cancer \ Appl/e【 and Goog【le say the】y'll work together to trace spr【ead of coronav\irus via smartpho】nes / 【 \ \ 】 】/ How EU funding is】\ chang【ing the face 】【\of Lat】vi\an innovation 【 / / Browse today's tagsThis expo \is unit/ing designers wit【h【 thou【sands of responsibl【y \source\d materials 】

Text siz【eAaAaStar//ting】 a new business/ i\s an/】 exc【iting time, as you emb\ark on\ your entrepr】eneur【ial/ fut【ure w【ith passio【【n and/ dete】rminat【ion\. For many of u【s, n/ew ventures【 often have sust】ainability as a focus. Whether it/&rsqu【o;s【 a dr【ink, a/ clothing brand, jewellery or a café【;, many of us want commit 【to a sustainable ethos as part of our /brand. But what about our //own sustainable effort/s? After all, 】you can’t set up an eco-/focused b\rand and then n\ot pay attentio/n to the sustainabili】ty】 of your own 【working\ day. We asked experts f\or advice o/n how to be a susta】inable】 start-u\p【, from day o】ne\. Make your launch party and gifting\ susta】inablePl【anni】ng an event/ and 】gifts for customers to welco【m【e your n【ew \‘business/ baby&rsq\uo; into/ the【 world is all very well, but you n/eed to do it in 【an /eco-friendly way. Bec E/van】s is author of How to Have a Happy Hustle. She advises, “m】ove\ away fro/m bub【ble wrap envelopes, and th】ink about bi\odegradable \goody【 bag/s – and no glitter balloo/ns! 】/Think about【 plastic in gi/fts and plas\tic waste when giftin\g. It&r\squo;s a】bout showi【ng intention &nd\ash; when you set up a \business\ it’s abo\ut building a community \and workin\g w\ith ea【rly users. Think ‘do【es t【he wor/ld really n】ee/d this?’&rdq\uo;.R/ela】t【ed | 9 susta】inable economy startups a/【i】ming to\ cl【ean up o/ur future 【Make su】stainability\ a &ls】quo;/given’, not a &lsquo/;must】 do/’Jesse Tran and So\n Chu are fellow students from Vietnam who\ 】are s/tar】t】i\ng their own trainer bus】iness and their p】roducts are made f】rom recycle\d coffee cups. \Stu【dying】 in Finland, t【hey saw 】clear】 diffe/rences in 】the way thi】n\gs wer】e produced and /the/ sustaina\ble】 the way of life. The【y&rsq】uo;ve channelled /that into\ their【 brand, RENS. The pair started using an organic cott【on bu\t【 realised this would have/】【\ an environmental impact an】/d so switch】ed to a\ new fabric.\】 &l/dquo;As /millennia【ls, for 【us sustainability shou\ld be a given\,&rdquo/; sa/ys Jess/e. “We want t】o p【lay a 【role as ambassa/dor/s &nda】sh; it【&rs\quo;s /easier to liv【e a sust/ainable life in Finland!”/Rel】ated |The brands launching sunglasses mad/e fr\om human hair, milk bottles \a】nd coffee waste View this post on I\ns】ta【gramRens are【 best sh】ared with \frie【nds! #renshipA post shared by/ Rens Ori\gi【n\al (@rensoriginal) on Aug 19, 2\019 \at 9:0Gra/pe skin leather\ is one of the】/ alternativ/es. \a\m P/DT【Think ab/out【 the entire prod/uction chainSo you&/r】squo;ve c/hosen your start-up./ Now to find】 a way to produce】 the 【product】. Sustaina\bility needs to be considered from start /to 【f\inish. Paul Turton i/s the Man】aging Dire】ct\or at Pact, a lead\ing speciality coffee s\erv】ice. He reveals that \they know customers are more likely/ to choo/se a brand or product that h】】【as【 purpose at the he\art of the business, so you should 【consider making this a k】ey /part of your company proposition.“S/ustainability is one 【of our\ core values, from t/he \farming wor】kfor/c】e in t\he co/untries/ w】【e buy our/ coffee/ from, to the /far/ming pra\ctices, ethics, shippin/g【, wa【/rehous】e【\s and roasting of the co】ffee,” he says. &l】dquo;It wouldn't be r】ig】ht to ask peop/le to work in 】a【 way that doesn't s】how us up】\holding our own standard/s - /no ma/tte/r the 【size of our busines\s.&rdqu\o;Jesse and【 Son fr\om Rens agree that their biggest tip【 is to 】find 【a g/ood/ sustainable base】. They work /from Aalto universit】y. &ldq】uo;Th【e lights are/ all aut/omat/ic, and\ everything is optimis/ed【/\,” sa】ys Jesse.Is your office space susta/i/nability-f【r】iendly?According to Bec Evans, “happiness is the j\ump】ing-off】 point【 【【for【 becoming a\ &lsq【uo;si】\d】e h/ustler’, and one of】 the reaso/ns si/de hus\tles are growing 】so 】much is \b】ecause you】 can work /from【 /anywhere\.” So\ that/&】rsquo;s a g】ood place to s\tart 【&n】dash; is yo】ur chosen place /of work】 sustaina】ble? Whether it’s at home】, a 【co/-w】ork/ing【 space o\r ren/【ted of\fic\e, y\ou need】 t\o c\onsider everything from the recycling p】\olicy to energ/y use.Susan Steven\s, /a CEO and Founder o【f/ 【M/a/de 【with R【espect ad/ds, “balancing between business objectives /and sus【tainability is ve【ry hard】 in the modern wo【】r【ld. \Our current【 business \model i/s b【ased \on con\】/sumerism, brands fighting for more an\d more】 sales, making customers buy thing【s they don【’t n【e】ed and have \t/【o th\row t【hem awa/y 】i/n a mon】\th or two.\ App】r\oxi\m】ately 1.3 bil\lion tons o/f 【wa【ste is 】prod】uced globally each year, this numb【er is ex【pected to increase to 2.2 billion tons p/\e/【r year by 2025】. This is alarming.”R】elated /| 5 s】tunning examples/ of/ g\reen architecture around the worldCommit to /recyclingThis may f\ee\l li\k\e /a more obvious one,\ but recycling can get forgotten 【when \you&rsquo/;re wonderi/ng abo【ut the provenance of the /cotton for those new bags you’re mak【ing\. Keep/ a kee【n eye on the re\cycling \opt】ions at your wor【kplace and of your prod\uct, expert【s sa】y. Paul Tur】to\n/ adds, &ld【quo\;it&rs】quo;s good 【to get into good /habits fr【om t/he start, then when the busi\ness/ gro】ws, it’s already ingrained in t】he cult/ure/. People don&r\squo;t o\ften r】ealise【 you can 】even \recycle used coffee grounds, it’\s best\【\ to seek out/ sup/pli【er/s【 who 】can help you do this, we use First Mile\ Rec【\ycling】 a\n【d Bio-Bean 【or simply \get a compost【 bin in the o【ffice.&r/dq/uo;First Mile founder】 and CE\O, Br】uce Bratley, adds, “when it 【com】es to recycling, it【's【 i】mport\ant to remember that no【t all was【te companies deal wit\h wa】ste in the same w【ay. 】It'\s essent【ial t\o ide\nt/ify one tha\t will\ continue you】r sustainabi\li【ty effo】rts aft【er you/r waste leaves yo\ur pr】emises to 【avoid it ending up in landfill sites where it will pr【o【duce green】h【ouses gases, such as metha】ne.”\Fi【】nd people who】 are on the sa\me sustainab】ility /page as \you\Wo/\rking with like-minded peop【le will mean y【ou】 develop \a st】rong sustain】ability】 mantra across the d\ay and into the future. David Ke】lly, Gener\al Manager \for \Eu【rope, Middle East and】 Africa a【t Deputy】, a co【mpa】\ny /that w\orks with】 lots of start-ups, s\ays, &\ldquo;to grow/ sustainably and /re/tain talent, you need/ to b】rin\g people on the j】ou/r/ney with you.】 Pay th/em pro【perly a【nd\ on time and prove wor】k w/il/l fit into their\ lif【e. In/ve\sting【 in tools that allow you to /d】o【 thi】s wi\l【l bu】ild 【trust amongst a dedicated work【f【】o【rce who /will be your en\gi】/ne fo/r grow/th.”/Buy 【second】 hand\ supplies and th】ink about packagingHow exciting is it when yo】u】 start\ a ne【】w business t【】o 【go all out on the stationa/ry, fun new pens, plant pots, 】desk ch\intz and \fancy envelope【s? Right? B】ut all these things are sustaina\bi【lity nightmares. You 【know a【bo/ut fast fashion, but you also ne】ed to【 b/e awa\re of &ls】quo\;fast stationary’\./ Step away from the p/en\s - you’\ve /go】t lots at home already./A/nd that goes for /machines as\ \well as pens, adds Jason Dow\nes, MD at PowWowNow,】 &ldquo\;when businesses are sourcing /off】ice】 equipme】nt, the/y sho】ul\d s【eek appliances with \a】n ENERGY 】STAR label, which【 indica\tes that the equipment\ has achiev】ed ener/gy efficiency \sta【ndards set by the EU./ 】Computers, for example, us/e 30-65 percent les\s electricity, while there are also\ greener alternatives for a lo【t of t】echno】l\ogy, such as/ energy-【efficient l\i\ghtb\u】lbs or solar-pow\ered】 smart】 speakers.&】【rdquo/;】Ros【alind Rathou【se run】s a s】ustainable cookery \school.】 She says, “when setti】ng up/ the \office of your ne\w bus\iness or start-】up,\ don&\rsquo;t be tem/pted to buy everythin/g new/. 【\Recycle where you can, use Fo【\rest/\ Stew/a】rdship Cou】ncil produc【ts and/ choose s\ustainable energy provider】s. Incorporate 】sustainability processe【s from d\ay one an\d emphasise/ the im【portance of waste management and re】ducin/g plastic.”Think about y【our energy supplierBills【 aren’t the mo\st glamorou】s t】/】opic, but choose the right ene\rgy sup】plier; you could save money as well as the p\lanet. B/ruce Bratl\ey ex/plai\/ns, “there i【s a growing】 r】ange 【of fully renewable energy pro\viders that 】can /pow【er your busi】ness withou【t creatin】g 【/extra/ greenhouse】 gas emissions, and even green web【 hosti/ng companies with renew【abl/e energy a】nd carbon offsetting s】ch【emes. Bu【sinesses can\ sav/e resourc\es】 by ensu【ring th】at they're signed up to pa【perle【ss【 billing for all of t\h】eir bills.【 Devel/oping gre【en habits in the 【workplace is/ easy\ and ca\n have a \signi】fica【nt impa】ct, f\or exampl\e, m【akin/g sure lig\hts and screens aren't being left on】 needlessl/y, using publi\c transpor】t to】 /g】et to me\etings and making sure e【veryo\ne \has easy access to】 【recycling bin/s.”Th】ink\ abo【ut em【otiona\l susta【inability, tooOnce you】’ve done /all you can】 to be sustain\able with the pr【acti/cal things, you need to th】ink about your own mental well【being, to【o, /adds Bec Evans. “A\ lo\t of people set up side h【ustles because/ they 】are solving problems in【 some way a/nd I s】peak to【 a l\ot【 of peop\le in areas of health \and mental wellbeing who fee\l the pro】ble\ms 】/they see a/ren’t bein【g solved. /Talk to customers /and /ask/ them wh\at they think./ Be t\rue\ to your values. If sustain【ability is something that mo/tivat/es y】ou then it&\rsquo;s important to】 check y【ou’re in 】l】/i【ne with your 【/own va\lues.”W】ords:/ Jenny S【ta【llardShare/\ this article M【o/re from lif/e

Text siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifeText si】zeAaAa\The top supermarket chain in Malaysia 】is\ prohi/biting the sale of anti-\palm 】produc】/ts, in an attempt to preserve its c\ontroversial key commo/dity.Mala/y】sia’s largest sup\ermarket, M【ydin, has today announ\ce】d a ban o【n 】any item that 【is labelled【 ‘p【alm】-oil-free&rsqu/o; a\s i/t believes this dam/ages the reputation /of palm oil produ/ction.\】 【The s\outh-e\ast Asian country is the secon【d largest】 pr\oducer of the oil】, after In】donesia. Th【e two 【neighbouri】ng nations produce a【【rou】nd 85% /of 【the world&rs】quo【【;s palm to【【【g】e/t/her, contrib【uting to a billion industry aroun】d the g\l/ob【e.\The supermarket's decision\ follows a 】lobbying offensive launched by】 the Malaysian government in 2018 to defen\d the p【alm oil】 \industry from becoming \obs/olete. \Af\ter【 a】 Washingt\on c\onsultancy present】ed a \paper likenin【g palm o】i\l to \tobacco, Ma【laysia stepped up its protectionist measures to en【sure the oil/ /【/does\ not become a “【pariah】 product”.Land that has been \clearedat an oil\ pal/m plantati】on in Johor, Mal】aysiaReu【tersDeclining to 】specify the amount o【f anti-pa\lm pr【oduct【s【 sold at his【 chain, Ameer Ali My【din, m【an】agi【ng\ direct】or of Mydin Mohame】d Holdings】 Bhd told reporters【 “we \must suppo】rt palm oil【/”. &ldquo/;By labelling something that there is no palm oil, you&r\sq/uo;re actually 】telling p/eople t\hat palm oil is bad for you”, h\e said, emphasising /the\ /impo\rtance of the ind【ust/ry to 【the\ Malaysian econo【my.Rela【ted |/ Estée Lau【der launches su\stain\able scheme to t】ackle 】palm oil productionTeresa Kok, Malaysia/&rsqu【o【;s minister o】f 【pr/i/m】ar【y indus/trie】s, agreed with the s\upermarket’s decision【 and encouraged othe/\r cha【ins 】in 【Malaysia to do the same/.Mydin's I\】nstagram account shared\ thi【】s video toda】y, promotin\g 'Kar】nival Saya\ngi Sawi】tku'\, tr】anslated【 as 'My Dear Palm Carnival' la【unched 】by\ minist】\er 【Tere\sa Kok hersel/f. Vie】w【 this post on In/stagramMenteri 【Ind】ustri U\tama, YB Puan Teresa \Kok mela\nca】rk】an K/【arnival 】Sayangi \Saw\itku di Pasar Raya MYDIN\ USJ\, Suban【g Jaya. Karnival Sayangi Sawitku adalah anjuran Ma/jlis Minyak Sawit Malaysia (MPOC), denga】n】 kerjasama MYDIN.. Karnival be【rmula da【r\i 5【 /】Sept hin\gga 【8// /Sep\t 2019. Jom】 ramai 】ram\ai memeriahkan/ lagi karnival ini‼️ . #mydinmalays\ia #mpoc】 #sayangi【【sawi】tkuA post shared by MYDI/N Malaysia \(@/mydi//nmalaysia) on Se】p 5】, /2019 at 2:/53a/m PDTIn response t【o the】 】n】ew/s, the Environme\ntal Jus\tice Founda/tion (EJF) spo\ke to Euronews Li】ving. "Banning \pa/lm-oil \free pr\】oducts is】 a re/t\r/ogra【de 】and p/oorly thought-out move that 【will co\st Mydin", said S/teve Trent, EJF's【 Executive\ Director. He went/ 】on to】 【say/ that /palm oil production causes "unwa】rran【ted】 and untena】ble destru【c【tion 【】of t】he rainforest" end【angering s】pe\cies. In Trent's own words, the expansion 【of pal【m oil estates "must /end now."Offering some adv\ice to the Ma/laysian chain of supermarkets, Trent conclude/d\:"Rat\her than refusing to sell palm-oil-f【ree products, Mydin should put a】l【l t】heir \effo【rt in to e/nsuring that any pa/lm oil they do\ s\ell i【s &】nd【ash; verifiably \– sustainable, legal】 and ethical. It must not lead to【 any more def\or【estatio\n. 】We need to see /t\ransparency and\ independent inspect/ions across the se\ctor\, from seed 【t【o supermar】\ket shelf."In\te\rnational/ appro】ach 】】to pal】m oil produ\ct【ionPalm oil is a vast industr/y, prese【nt in half 】】of a【【l\l s\u\permark】et products fro】m cosmetics and make up to froz\e/n pizzas, biscuits and margarine. It is the target of swathes of envi\ronmental act\ivi【sm due to deforestation, wh\ich destroy【s 【the natu【ral habit【at of 【man【y species like orangutans.Steps have been taken on an intern/ational level to boy/cott t】he industry. Earlier this y】ear】, the Eur/opean Union passe/d /a law to phase out pal【【m oil from renewable fue/l by 2030 and over 【250 organisati/ons con/d\emned the【 ‘g\re/enwas/hing’ of palm】 oil /as sustainable】,】 according to Rainforest Re\scue.In August,【 Mal】aysian\ Pr【ime Minis】ter Mahathir Moh/amad fou】g/ht back, claiming that the accusation pal\m oil was 】linked to defor\estation】 w】a【s\ “baseless, un】fair a【n/【】d unjustified.” H\e claims th\at【 the【 /industry is act】in\g “responsibly【&rdquo\; and shou【ld not be attac【ked【,// as it 】is contributing grea】tly to the so【cio-economic wel】l-b】e/ing of the Malaysian /people.S】/h】are this a】rticle \ / More from life,见下图

The Ol\d Port, Mars】eille\’s popular wa】terfro/nt, h\ides a dirty secret.Electric scooter【s, tires a【nd pla】s】tic bottles litter 【【the seafloor.Annual clean-up operationEver【/y 】【ye】ar, volunte/e/rs gat/her/ to clean up some of /the mess. Hundreds of scuba divers collect th/e \rubbish, whic】h is t【h/en【 sor\ted\ an【】d rec\ycled, or otherwise safely dispose/d】 of,【 by 】l】oc\al activists.&ldqu】o;We find a 【lot of【 scooters, ra【i【ling【s, cans, bottle【s,” says Angie Espine【l Caño【n, 】a volun【\t/eer with// Team 13. &ld【quo;The goal【 i【sn&rsqu/o;t just to clean up, it&rs/quo;s also to 】ra】】ise awareness】.&r/dquo;“Last year, we recover【ed 91【m3 /of \waste,” s/ays I\sabelle P/oi】tou/, anoth】er volunt【eer f】】rom the Merterre Associa/tio\n. “The year【 before it】 was 13】1m3, so \that’s a decrease of 40m/3. This/ year, j【udging \from what I c/an s【ee】 and my experience, \I’d say it&rsquo】;s les\s again."We fin】d a lot /of scooters, rail/ings, \cans and bot/tles. The goal isn’t just to clean up, it【’s also to raise awareness. 【 Angie Espinel Cañ/【on / Vo【luntee】r, Team 13 】 With smu\rfs 】for ma】scots, the\ event】 i【s】 a part of the "EU Be】ach Cleanup" campaign -\ h【elping to raise aw//areness of the Europe/an response /to th】e\ marine p】ol【lut/【i【on pro\blem【. One o/f【 the divers is Alai\n Dumor/t — 【the EU’s representa/tive in Mars/eille.“Some 】waste is potentially 】recyclable,&rd/quo; says Dum\ort【. “But 【unfortu\nately 【【not/ sin\【gle-use objects, which go strai\ght in the bi/n. That's why from 2021 the /EU /will 】be banni\】n/g all this kind of single\-use utensils &\mdash; pla】tes, s】tir【rers, cotton bu【ds, /and so on - all the things yo/u fr【】equently find on be】ac】】he\s will be banned.”Mos】t ocean waste co/mes from urban areasAn imp\ortant aspect of the campaign is public outre/ach. Mi】【llions 】of tons of/ waste - mostly coming from u/rban are\a】【s - 】en】d /up in \the ocean 】every/ yea\/r】/.】 It’s been calc\ulated that on every square】 mile /of ocean, thous【ands of piec】es o\f rubbish \are floating./“The fig\ures【 【show that【 80% of marine li\tter originates on land,” ex\pl】ains Olivier Bianchimani/, th】e dir】ector of Septentri\on 】Environneme\nt. “It'【s eithe【r w/ashed away【 by 】/rivers or dis【carded/ d【irectl】y into/ the sea. As you can imagi\ne, it wasn't wind that brough】t r/ailings and bicycles /here.”At \over 【7【0 beach cle】an\up eve【nts organised t\his year b【y the EU a【nd the UN, almost 40 /000\ participants collect\ed ar】ound 】850 ton/s of waste &md\ash; from Camb【/odia to Haiti - and Argenti/】na to】 No【rway.The】 figu/】res show 】\】that 80% of ma/【rin\e litter ori】ginates【 on la/nd. 【 【 【 【Ol【ivier Bianchimani 【 【 Director, Septent】r/ion】 Environnement 【 &ldqu】\o/;This needs to be s/een i/n a【 much broade\r c【ontex】t,&rdq【uo; says Dumort. \&ldqu\o;Ot】herwi【se t\】his would be a loca【l event,【 and you’d be asking \wha\t's】 Europe go【t to do with it. Europe's involved/ precisely because this is a globa】l problem, and 】requi】res a whole s/eries 】o】f a/ct/ions and laws a】t an i】nternational l\/e】v】el.”The Euro/pean Union is\ leading the globa】l 】fight \aga/inst marine li】tter.【 Be//sides its 【policies curbing single-use p\【lastics【 and re/ducing waste from lost fishing gear, the /EU has earmark】/ed\ €350 million for research an【d deve【lopment.Mini-cata】maran scoops】 debris from t\he wa】ter\One/ of the EU-supported tec/hnologies is WasteSha【rk,【 devel【oped in Rotterd】am. A re\motely contr\olled 【m【in\i-catamara】n removes plastics /and othe【r floating deb【ris from【】 the surface of t/he water. Its sen【sors can monito【r pollution levels and \other environmental indi\cator】s. It's electri\call/y powered, emission-\free and ca\n collect hundreds of】 kilos of rubbish/\ at a time.“What we'/re】 trying to do is 】create a \small /enough vessel that will 【get into ti】ght spaces w\here waste col\lect\s, particularly in ha/【rbours and ports, and s/top all【 that waste bei【ng taken out into the greater ocean," says Richard Ha【rdiman, the 【founder on Ranmarine T\echn】ologi/es, the startup behi】nd WasteShark.【The bas】ic function of the WasteShar【/k is very simple. But \ins】ide, it【's a】lways changing &mdash】; 【we【're al【ways trying to make it lighter, mo\re eff/icient/, ea】s\ier to do maintenance on. \ /T】\essa Despinic \ 【 / WasteS【hark】 Design Engineer \ 【 】 / \Ranmarine alrea【d【y has c】us】t\omers in s\everal countries. Enginee【rs ar【e workin\g to make the d\evice\ ful【ly auto\nomous — so it】 can\ c】ollect litter and br\ing 】it back t/o the /recharging station /wi【t【h the need for a pilot.“The】】 basi】c \【【fun【ction】 】of the Wast\eShark is very simple,” says 】d】esi/gn engineer Tess\a Despinic. 】&ldq【uo;It just s】wi】m\s around and collec\t\s【 【tras【h from the su】rface. B【u\/t inside, it's alwa\ys chang/【ing — we're【 \always trying to mak//e it 】\lighter, more effic】ient, easie】r to 】do maintenance\ on. And we're also【 building a\n a【utonomous version t/hat will swim \aroun】d according】 to/ waypo/ints that yo\u give it. So w【e're a\lways wor【king on th】at and】 maki】ng it better.】"I\n the near future\, the de/velop/e】【rs envisage swarms 【of their rob【ots \picking up floa/】ting rubbi/【sh.“I have\ /a】 vision in my hea【【d that keeps m\e】 going,” says Hard/iman. “Tha/t is what we'd be sitt/ing in a\ c\ontrol room an】d from our site, we could see whe】re e/very drone is acros【s th\e planet, how many are【 operating, how 【/much waste is bei\】ng caught — an/d actually see the real impact 】of 】that these things are ma【king around the wor】ld."Technical s【【olutions an】d clean-up campaigns are important. But the simple way】 to keep our se【as】 \hea】lt【hier is to\ drop less litter — a】】nd】 tha【t’s】 a lesson for childre\n and/ adults alike.121212121Share\ t/his articleCopy/past】e the a】rticle v\】id】eo 【embe【d li】nk below:CopyShareT/weetSharesendS/har【/】eTweetSharesendMo/reHideShareSendShareSha/reShareSendShareShareYou migh】t also like \ / 】 Wha/t/’s killing/ ou\r und】erwater ecosystems? / 【 Mor\e 【abo\【utContamination of wate【rEnvironmen\tal prote】ctionSea Most viewe/d 】 \ 】 W\hat influence on \climate is 】the coron/avirus】【 】\lockdown really having? 】 【 【 \ The new AI system saf/egu】/【arding pre/mature /babi】es\ from infect\io\n 】【 Messenger/ RNA: 【the mo/【lecule that may teach our bodies to beat c/ancer 【 】 / \ 【【 【 【 Apple a】】nd Google /say they\'ll wor\k toge\ther to trace spread of cor】onaviru】s vi\【a smartphones / Ho/w EU fundin/g is ch\anging the f/ace of Lat】vian innova/ti/on / Brow【se today's ta/gsWe /spea】k 】to【 s/oci\al \anthropologist Mathilde Hojr【up】 Autzen abou/t how a Dani/s】h fishing c【ommu/nity】/ is now t【hriving a【fter ne【arly bei\n【g\ wiped out by f/ishing /quotas】.【Share this articleCo】py/paste the article video embed link below:Co\pyShareTw\eetSha【\resendShareT】w】eetS【haresendMoreHideSha【/reSendShar/eShareShareSendShare/ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 Depleted fish sto【cks can’t wait. The】 E】U and Norway need to commi【t t【o ending overfishi【ng now ǀ V/ie/w 】 【 】 【 \ Activist/s are rais【in\g funds to sav】e【 Danish wooden boats / / //More aboutF\i/sheryEnvironmen/tal【/【 protectionDenmar/k 】 \ / Most\ viewed 【 \ 】 // 】/ What influence on cl\ima\te 【】is the /c\orona/virus lockdown r/eally having? \ \【 The new AI system safeguard\ing premature babies from i】nfecti\o【n \ 【 【 】 Messenger RNA: the m】olecule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer / 】 \ Apple and Google say they'll wo/rk together to trace sp【read of coronavirus via sm【ar\tphones 【 【 】 】 How EU funding is 【chan】g】ing the f】【ac【e【 of Latvi】an i【nnovation\ 【 】 Browse today's t/agsLife under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tagsText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tags。星力手游捕鱼

Dub】ai acts to ste【m the 】ti【de of single use plastic【9;M/onster fa】tberg',\ bi【gger than the 【Tower of Pis】a, discov/【ered in D】evon /To【r\re Guaceto, a】n eight-kilometre long stretch of coastli【ne north-west of Brindisi, used to be【 know/n as a centre for poor fishing practic\es, black market smuggling and /a drop-off point 【for illegal immi\gration.Now it's famous around t【he world for the【 way 】it's t【ransf/ormed itsel】f.The coast i【s n】ow a\ p\rotected mar【ine 【re\serve and s【trict】 rules are in /place so that /tourism\ and fishin/g don’t】 har】m the nat\ural env\ironment.The【 European Uni】on】 h\as comm\itted to se\t aside 10 per ce/nt o【f【 all i】ts waters as 】marine protecte【d\ ar\eas by 2020. This targ/et was met two y】ears before the d//eadline. Today, 62】5,000 squa【re kilometre/s of marine and coastal waters in Europe are protected, which 【is 【expected to bring【 m/ore than 3 billion euros of annual benefits.In/ 2/001, Torre Guaceto imposed a 【/five-yea/r ban 【on f/ishi】ng to rebui【\ld the ca/\tastrophic\all【y declining s/tocks. To】day, a fe\w loc【als/ are permitted to fish fo\r j】ust one day a wee/k, usin】\g n】ets that c】an’t catch】 small fish.Fisherma【n Cosimo De Bi\asi to【ld 】Ocean/: 】【“Be/\f】】ore the r/eserve w【as\ /establish/ed, this 】whole area was rife 【with dyna】mite fish/i】ng/, cigaret【\te【 smuggling and illegal immigr】a/nts. Today, thanks to /the p【r\otected area, all we can see here is th】e pristine sea.”The protecte【d area is man\aged by【 a consortium \that represents【 local communities and/ the/ World Wide Fu【nd for Natur】e, th】e// WWF.It enf/orces the rul】es that have【 been \agreed with \the fish\ermen. Th【at \includes monitoring the\/ir catches to ma\k【e su/re that the pr】otection e】ffor\【ts are 【effective.And the fishermen are happy with【 the new controls on what t/\hey catch.“When we ca\t】ch a big fish an\d brin/g i\t ashore, we can sell【 it n【ot for f/\ive eur/o/】s, but for】 /20 【to 25 euros,&r】【dquo; De Biasi said.Francesco \de Franco, head of t【he envir\onmental an【d technical unit at the Torre Guaceto con\sortium, said fish stocks h\a】ve recovered in the marine reser\ve.&l】dquo;O【utside the protect\ed area, the levels of\ fish /rem\ain basically the same】 as in the past. And in\s】ide this are\a, the \fis/h /s】tocks have rough【ly doubled,\" h】e \said.Wider be/nefitsAnd /it’s no】t just the sea that&rsquo\;s【 being protected. The dunes and we【t【lands along t】he/ coas\tline are a precious stop-off point for migratory bi/rds】 and a perman【【ent 】home to m/any l/ocal /spec】【ies.\The Torre /Guaceto area, named after its 】centuries-ol\d watchtowe】r, is patrolled day \】and ni】ght by the coast guard and 】the police. They】 【say most danger toda【y comes【【 from careless visito【rs w\ho might pick plants or damage coral\ near the shor\e.To/urists\ who re/spect the environment are welcome).In the p【ast, these sandy beaches were 【f\ull of litter and overcrowded. 】】Cleaning up the area, 】introdu\c】ing 】guided t/our\s and【 l\imiting car a】ccess\ made a 】big diff【erence: now, 【in peak】 season,/ Torre Guaceto /gets】 visited /by 5000-6000/ tourists a day.Mimmo Miccoli fro】m Bres/cia has been visiting for years.&ldq\uo;This /place used to be a m】ess, wi】th/\ cars parked every/where,"\ /he told Oce】an. "Now, all the cars have to /be l/eft in the car /pa【r【【k at th\e\ top of t\he roa\d /—【 /】so the pl】ace is 【no/w much 【nice/r, cl/eaner\.”The \f\low of tourist\s 【also bene【fi【ts businesses that have embraced the】 t\rend for sust/ainability.Ma】ria\ Lanz【il/otti 【runs a restaur/ant in nearby Car/ovigno which s/pe\cial【【ises in lo【ca【l orga/nic cu\isin】e.&l【dquo;We always/ have fresh, good, healthy fish from the se【a," /she said. "And ou】r lan】d produces lo/ca/l toma/toes and so on, so it is very import【ant \for me and for all of us restaurateurs /to have this natural \【res【erve — it’s our marvel!&rdquo/;Backed by European f\unds, o/ne-thi【rd of 】local farms have n\o/w conve\【rted to【 organic productio/n, boos】ti【ng 【the【ir sales by associati/ng their brand【s with the n】ow fam\ous Torr】e Guaceto pr\otected【 area.E】stablished to preserve the environment, this marine protected ar【/ea became an attractive/ ec\o-】tourism destinat】ion with a/ sus/tainabl】e econ\omy &mdas\h; a success story th】a】t\ expert/s say should serv/e an example to othe】r places 】like Torre Gua/ceto/.Ni】co】lò Carnimeo, 【vice-presid【ent of the Torr】e Guaceto mana【gement consortium, \s/ai】d:【 “I \would\ say【 t】hat protecting 10 per cent of 【Eur【ope’s waters is st\ill not eno【ugh — we sho\uld go further, keepi】ng in mind the s/o-called /circ】ul】ar eco】nomy, l\ike wh\at we ha【ve he\re. Thi/s does work, and I would say thi】s is how i【【t should be d】one in other mar【ine protecte】【d areas 】too.&r【dquo;1212121212【/1212Sha/re thi】s articleCopy/p】ast/e the article video embed link】 below【【:CopyS【ha】re\TweetSh\ar【esen/dShar/eTweetS\haresendMoreHid/eShareSendShareShareShareSendSha【reShareYo/u might al【so lik\e 】 / \ Sea ch/an/ge: how 】one 】small】 stretch of coastline in Italy tr】ansfo】rmed itself 】 /【 More aboutEnviro【nm】ental protec【【tionFauna and FloraFisherySea 【 \ \ Most /】v【iewed 【\ \ 】 What in/fluence/ on c【li【mate】】 【is \th\e coronavir】\us】 lockdo\wn r【eally having? 【 / / 【 \ 【【 】 The new AI system sa】feguarding premature ba】bies \from infectio】n 】 \ Messen】ger R】】NA: the molecule that may te【ac/h our bodies to beat cancer / 】 Apple and 】【G\oogle say they'll work together to tra/】c\e spr【ead of c/oronavirus via【 smartphones 【 / / / How】 EU fun\d【ing is【 changing/ t】he face o\f Latv/ian innovation/】 / \ 【 / 【 Brow【se today'/s tagsText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesSoybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020。星力手游捕鱼

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